THE MOVIE
SOUNDTRACK
DELETED SCENES AND OUT-TAKES
ORIGINAL ENDING
FILM LOCATIONS
PETER WEIR
JOAN LINDSAY
STORY OF PICNIC
AFTER THE PICNIC
HANGING ROCK
ANNE LAMBERT
IN LOVING MEMORY
JANE VALLIS
NEWSPAPERS
DID YOU KNOW?
MY COLLECTION
PHOTO ARCHIVE
RADIO ARCHIVE
VIDEO ARCHIVE
RARE PHOTOS
MAILS FROM THE CAST MEMBERS

THE WEBMASTER

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JOAN LINDSAY

Lady Joan Beckett Lindsay (16 November 1896 – 23 December 1984) was an Australian novelist, playwright, essayist, and visual artist. Trained in her youth as a painter, Lindsay published her first literary work in 1936 at age forty under a pseudonym, a satirical novel titled Through Darkest Pondelayo. Her second novel, Time Without Clocks, was published nearly thirty years later, and was a semi-autobiographical account of her early married years to artist Daryl Lindsay.

In 1967, Lindsay published her most celebrated work, Picnic at Hanging Rock, a historical Gothic novel detailing the vanishing of three schoolgirls and their teacher at the site of a monolith during one summer. The novel sparked critical and public interest for its ambivalent presentation as a true story as well as its vague conclusion, and is widely considered to be one of the most important Australian novels of all time. It was adapted into a 1975 film of the same name.

She was also the author of several unpublished plays, and contributed essays, short stories, and poetry to numerous journals and publications throughout her career. After the death of Lindsay's husband in 1976, she spent her time involved in the local art community in Melbourne, and was involved in several exhibitions. Her last published work, Syd Sixpence (1982), was her first and only work of children's literature. Lindsay died of stomach cancer in 1984, after which her home was donated to the Australian National Trust; the Lindsay estate now operates as a museum with she and husband Daryl's artwork and personal effects.


This is the Typewriter that Joan Lindsey typed the novel on.
(Thanks to Beky Tully-Gibbens for this picture)

Lindsay originally wrote an 18th chapter that explains what happened to the missing girls at Hanging Rock, but decided not to publish it following advice from her publisher. Perhaps because the book doesn’t explain what happened to the missing parties, the book became a huge success. Lindsay refused to ever tell the public what happened to the girls and their teacher, but readers have come up with numerous theories about what happened. Lindsay has peppered her novel with hints to indicate both that the story could be real and that it could be fake. The novel opens with a note from the author:

Whether Picnic at Hanging Rock is fact or fiction, my readers must decide for themselves. As the fateful picnic took place in the year nineteen hundred, and all the characters who appear in this book are long since dead, it hardly seems important.

 

Joan Lindsay (1896-1984) Typescript of 'Picnic at Hanging Rock' ca. 1967

"Picnic at Hanging Rock" Site. Created by Sandra Gambino. 2005 - 2019
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